Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, Jr. and US - Indo Pacific Relations

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Coordinator: Sarah Wang. For methodology, click here.

This resource will track statements, developments, visits and other interactions in US-Asia Pacific relations given or undertaken by Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, Jr. 

To view current quotations, debriefs of interactions with Asia Pacific leaders, and media sorted by topic, scroll down or use the links below. To view those made by Secretary Ross in 2017, visit this page for a historical list

Travel to Asia Pacific Countries Asia Pacific Leaders Asia Pacific Allies & Partners
China/Taiwan Human Rights & Democracy North Korea
South China Sea Southeast Asia/ASEAN Summits - APEC, East Asia (EAS), & US-ASEAN
Trade & Investment    

To view the stances of President Trump, Vice President Pence, United States Trade Representative Lighthizer, Secretary of Defense Mattis, Secretary of State Pompeo, and Secretary of Commerce Ross on various issues in US-Asia Pacific relations, click here.

To view quotations, interviews, and policy documents given by and interactions with Asia Pacific leaders undertaken by President Trump, Vice President Pence, United States Trade Representative Lighthizer, Secretary of Defense Mattis, and Secretary of State Pompeo use the links below.

President Donald J. Trump Vice President Mike Pence
United States Trade Representative Ambassador Robert E. Lighthizer Secretary of Defense James Mattis 
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo  

To examine Asian reactions to ongoing developments in US-Asia relations and the US 2016 Presidential election,click here.

To explore previous quotations, views on Asia Pacific issues, and other connections to Asia from President Trump, Vice President Pence, and other candidates in the 2016 Presidential Election, click here.

Travel to Asia Pacific Countries

  • Chinese Flag. Image: Flaticon. China in May 2018. 

For a historical list of countries traveled to in 2017, click here

Asia Pacific Leaders 

  • "At the invitation of Vice Premier Liu He and at the direction of President Donald J. Trump, the United States trade delegation, led by Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin and including Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Assistant to the President for Economic Policy Larry Kudlow, and Assistant to the President for Trade and Manufacturing Policy Peter Navarro, traveled to Beijing, and was joined there by Ambassador Terry Branstad. The delegation held frank discussions with Chinese officials on rebalancing the United States–China bilateral economic relationship, improving China’s protection of intellectual property, and identifying policies that unfairly enforce technology transfers.  The United States delegation affirmed that fair trade will lead to faster growth for the Chinese, United States, and world economies." [Source] Statement on the United States Trade Delegation's Visit to Beijing. May 4, 2018 

For a historical list of meetings with Asia Pacific leaders in 2017, click here

Asia Pacific Allies & Partners

  • "Today [May 30, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of citric acid and certain citrate salts from Belgium, Colombia, and Thailand, and its negative final determination in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of imports of citric acid and certain citrate salts from Thailand. [...] In 2017, imports of citric acid and certain citrate salts from Belgium, Colombia, and Thailand were valued at an estimated $9.4 million, $17.6 million, and $73.2 million, respectively." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from Belgium, Colombia, and Thailand. May 30, 2018 
  • "Today [May 24, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan. [...] In 2017, imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan were valued at an estimated $61.4 million, $23.7 million, $11.9 million, and $7.4 million, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Fine Denier Polyester Staple Fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan. May 24, 2018
  • "Today [May 1, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin from China and India. [...] Commerce preliminarily determined that exporters from China and India have sold PTFE resin in the United States at 69.34 to 208.16 percent and 18.49 percent less than fair value, respectively." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Polyetrafluoroethylene Resin from China and India. May 1, 2018
  • "Today [April 30, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) resin from Brazil, the Republic of Indonesia (Indonesia), the Republic of Korea (Korea), Pakistan, and Taiwan. [...] In 2016, imports of PET resin from Brazil, Indonesia, Korea, Pakistan, and Taiwan were valued at an estimated $51.7 million, $35.7 million, $24 million, $34.1 million, and $109.8 million, respectively." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Polyethylene Terephthalate Resin from Brazil, Indonesia, Korea, Pakistan and Taiwan. April 30, 2018
  • "Today [April 10, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of cold-drawn mechanical tubing from China, Germany, India, Italy, Korea, and Switzerland.  The Department also determined that critical circumstances exist for certain exporters/producers of cold-drawn mechanical tubing from Italy." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Cold-drawn Mechanical Tubing from China, Germany, India, Italy, Korea, and Switzerland. April 10, 2018
  • "Today [March 28, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether laminated woven sacks from Vietnam are being dumped in the United States or if producers in Vietnam are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] The alleged dumping margins range from 101.73 – 292.61 percent.  There are 19 subsidy programs alleged for Vietnam." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Laminated Woven Sacks from Vietnam. March 28, 2018
  • "Today [March 20, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of stainless steel flanges from China and India. [...] The Commerce Department preliminarily determined that exporters from China and India have sold stainless steel flanges in the United States at 257.11 percent, and 18.10 to 145.25 percent less than fair value, respectively. As a result of today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of imports of stainless steel flanges from China and India based on these preliminary rates." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Stainless Steel Flanges from China and India. March 20, 2018
  • "Today [March 20, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of imports of carbon and alloy steel wire rod from Italy and Turkey and AD investigations of carbon and alloy steel wire rod from Korea, Spain, and the United Kingdom. [...] In 2016, imports of carbon and alloy steel wire rod from Italy, Korea, Spain, Turkey, and the United Kingdom were valued at an estimated $12.2 million, $45.6 million, $40.7 million, $41.4 million, and $20.5 million, respectively." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping and Subsidization of Imports of Carbon and Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Italy, Korea, Spain, Turkey and the United Kingdom. March 20, 2018
  • "Today [March 1, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determination in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of imports of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin from India, finding that exporters in India received countervailable subsidies of 3.90 percent." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determination on Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin from India. March 1, 2018 
  • "Today [March 1, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of imports of silicon metal from Australia and Brazil, an AD investigation of silicon metal imports from Norway, and a CVD investigation of silicon metal imports from Kazakhstan. [...] The Commerce Department determined that exporters from Australia, Brazil, and Norway have sold silicon metal in the United States at 41.73 – 51.28 percent, 68.97 – 134.92 percent, and 3.22 percent less than fair value, respectively. Commerce also determined that Australia, Brazil, and Kazakhstan are providing countervailable subsidies to its producers of silicon metal at rates ranging from 14.78 percent, 2.44 – 52.51 percent, and 100.00 percent, respectively." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping and Subsidization of Imports of Silicon Metal from Australia, Brazil, Kazakhstan, and Norway. March 1, 2018
  • "Today [February 22, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether rubber bands from China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are being dumped in the United States or if producers in China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] In the AD investigations, Commerce will determine whether imports of rubber bands from China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are being dumped in the U.S. market at less than fair value. In the CVD investigations, Commerce will determine whether Chinese, Sri Lankan, and Thai producers of rubber bands are receiving government subsidies." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Rubber Bands from China, Sri Lanka and Thailand. February 22, 2018
  • "Today [February 21, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of biodiesel from Argentina and Indonesia. [...] The Commerce Department determined that exporters from Argentina and Indonesia have sold biodiesel in the United States at 60.44-86.41 percent and 92.52-276.65 percent less than fair value, respectively. As a result of today’s decisions, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of biodiesel from Argentina and Indonesia based on these final rates. In 2016, imports of biodiesel from Argentina and Indonesia were valued at an estimated $1.2 billion and $268 million, respectively." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Antidumping Duty Determinations on Biodiesel From Argentina and Indonesia. February 21, 2018
  • "Today [February 13, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether imports of large diameter welded pipe from Canada, China, Greece, India, Korea, and Turkey are being dumped in the United States and/or if producers are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] The unfair subsidy programs alleged include export subsidies, inputs for less-than-adequate-remuneration, tax incentives, and subsidized loans from China, India, Korea, and Turkey. [...] In 2016, imports of large diameter welded pipe from Canada, China, India, Greece, Korea, and Turkey were valued at an estimated $66 million, $139 million, $26 million, $70 million, $150.3 million, and $116.1 million, respectively." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Large Diameter Welded Pipe from Canada, Greece, China, India, Korea, and Turkey. February 13, 2018
  • "Today [January 29, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of low melt polyester staple fiber from Korea and Taiwan. [...] The Commerce Department preliminarily determined that exporters from Korea and Taiwan have sold low melt polyester staple fiber in the United States at 0.00 to 16.48 percent and 52.00 percent less than fair value, respectively. As a result of today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of imports of low melt polyester staple fiber from Korea and Taiwan based on these preliminary rates. In 2016, imports of low melt polyester staple fiber from Korea and Taiwan were valued at an estimated $76.6 million and $26.8 million, respectively." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Low Melt Polyster Staple Fiber from Korea and Taiwan. January 29, 2018
  • "Today [January 17, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of stainless steel flanges from the People’s Republic of China (China) and India, finding that exporters in China and India received countervailable subsidies of 174.73 percent, and from 5.00 to 239.61 percent, respectively. The Commerce Department will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of stainless steel flanges from China and India based on these preliminary rates." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determinations on Stainless Steel Flanges from the People's Republic of China and India. January 17, 2018
  • "Today [January 17, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determinations in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of fine denier polyester staple fiber from the People’s Republic of China (China) and India, finding that exporters from China and India received countervailable subsidies of 41.73 to 47.55 percent and 9.50 to 25.28 percent, respectively. The Commerce Department will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China and India based on these final rates." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Determinations on Fine Denier Polyester Staple Fiber from China and India. January 17, 2018

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here

China/Taiwan

  • "Today [June 12, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) investigations to determine whether steel propane cylinders from China, Taiwan, and Thailand are being dumped in the United States, and a new countervailing duty investigation to determine if producers in China are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] The alleged dumping margins are: China from 55.41 to 108.60 percent, Taiwan from 27.19 to 66.20 percent, and Thailand 47.67 to 122.48 percent. There are 18 alleged subsidy programs for China (two loan programs, three export credit/guarantee programs, five tax programs, three provision of goods for less than adequate remuneration programs, and five grant programs)." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty Investigations of Imports of Steel Propane Cylinders from China, Taiwan, and Thailand and a Countervailing Duty Investigation of Imports of Steel Propane Cylinders from China. June 12, 2018
  • "The U.S. wireless industry supports more than 4.7 million American jobs and contributes almost a half-a-trillion dollars — $475 billion — annually to the economy. But we cannot be complacent. While the United States leads the world in the application of 4G wireless technology, China and South Korea are trying hard to position themselves to dominate the next generation of 5G. China is shaping up to be the biggest 5G market by 2022, and the Chinese government has targeted 5G to develop its indigenous industry and dominate global export markets. But, as you know from the recent publicity surrounding ZTE, they do not yet themselves have all of the necessary technology. It is estimated that 5G could create up to 3 million new American jobs, and generate $500 billion a year in economic growth. That would be a 2.5 percentage point increase in our GDP." [Source] Remarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the NTIA Spectrum Policy Symposium. June 12, 2018
  • "Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross today [June 7, 2018] announced that Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment Corporation, of Shenzhen, China (“ZTE Corporation”) and ZTE Kangxun Telecommunications Ltd. of Hi-New Shenzhen, China (“ZTE Kangxun”) (collectively, “ZTE”) has agreed to severe additional penalties and compliance measures to replace the U.S. Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) denial order imposed as a result of ZTE’s violations of its March 2017 settlement agreement.  Under the new agreement, ZTE must pay $1 billion and place an additional $400 million in suspended penalty money in escrow before BIS will remove ZTE from the Denied Persons List. These penalties are in addition to the $892 million in penalties ZTE has already paid to the U.S government under the March 2017 settlement agreement." [Source] Secretary Ross Announces $1.4 Billion ZTE Settlement; ZTE Board, Management Changes and Strictest BIS Compliance Requirements Ever. June 7, 2018 
  • "Today [June 6, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determination in the antidumping duty (AD) investigation of imports of stainless steel flanges from China. Commerce determined that exporters from China have sold stainless steel flanges in the United States at 257.11 percent less than fair value." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Antidumping Duty Determination on Stainless Steel Flanges from the People's Republic of China. June 6, 2018
  • "Over the weekend, Administration officials, led by Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, concluded a series of meetings in Beijing with a delegation from the government of China, as part of ongoing trade discussions. The meetings focused on reducing the United States’ trade deficit by facilitating the supply of agricultural and energy products to meet China’s growing consumption needs, which will help support growth and employment in the United States. The United States officials conveyed President Donald J. Trump’s clear goal for achieving a fair trading relationship with China. The delegations will now report back to receive guidance on the path forward." [Source] Readout of Discussions between Administration Officials and a Delegation from China Regarding the Trade Relationship between the United States and China. June 4, 2018
  • "Today [May 30, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative preliminary determination in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of imports of certain plastic decorative ribbon from China, finding that exporters in China received countervailable subsidies ranging from 12.81 percent to 94.67 percent. [...] In 2017, imports of certain plastic decorative ribbon from China were valued at an estimated $22.5 million." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determination on Imports of Certain Plastic Decorative Ribbon from China. May 30, 2018
  • "Today [May 24, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan. [...] In 2017, imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan were valued at an estimated $61.4 million, $23.7 million, $11.9 million, and $7.4 million, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Fine Denier Polyester Staple Fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan. May 24, 2018
  • "The United States is looking at alternatives to the crippling sanctions threatening the survival of Chinese telecom giant ZTE, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC on Thursday. Ross said on 'Squawk Box' the U.S. is considering a plan to require compliance officers to be installed at ZTE, best known by consumers for selling smartphones. 'If we do decide to go forward with an alternative, what it literally would involve would be implanting people of our choosing into the company to constitute a compliance unit ... [which] would report back to the Department of Commerce,' he said. 'The whole key is enforcement.'" [Source] US considering placing compliance officers inside China's ZTE: Commerce Secretary Ross. May 24, 2018
  • "Successes include a dealer agreement between an American boat builder and a Chinese-based boat dealer looking to add a U.S. brand to their portfolio. [...] Several of our winners today count China as their number one international export market. In addition to the one mentioned earlier, there are five more:
      • Hydro-Thermal Corporation;
      • Flexo Concepts;
      • Santa Monica College;
      • Colorado State University; and
      • iTep International, a business that assesses English language skills in 51 countries.

    From day one, this Administration has been committed to leveling the playing field for businesses and organizations like yours. As you’ve seen in the news, we are working very hard to make China treat your companies more fairly and accept more imports." [Source] Remarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the President's E Awards Ceremony. May 21, 2018

  • "At the direction of President Donald J. Trump and President Xi Jinping, on May 17 and 18, 2018, the United States and China engaged in constructive consultations regarding trade in Washington, D.C. The United States delegation included Secretary of the Treasury Steven T. Mnuchin, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur L. Ross, and United States Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer. The Chinese delegation was led by State Council Vice Premier Liu He, Special Envoy of President Xi. There was a consensus on taking effective measures to substantially reduce the United States trade deficit in goods with China. To meet the growing consumption needs of the Chinese people and the need for high-quality economic development, China will significantly increase purchases of United States goods and services. This will help support growth and employment in the United States." [Source] Joint Statement of the United States and China Regarding Trade Consultations. May 19, 2018 
  • "The one sure thing is that President Trump meticulously honors his campaign promises, and key among them is making our trade relations with China much fairer. Some pundits have said this activity on trade will result in retaliation and undo the benefits of deregulation and the tax cuts. This is an exaggeration. If China retaliates with a 25 percent tariff on $50 billion of our exports, we would lose a major fraction of that volume but not all. For the sake of argument, assume that we lost all of that volume. The hit would be only $50 billion. This would be painful to the direct targets, but have less than a three-tenths of one percent impact on our $18 trillion economy, and it would partly be offset by the reduced imports of the goods on which we imposed our original 25 percent tariffs. Some portion of those would be produced domestically. Also, the President has directed the Agriculture Department to use all of its power to ameliorate the impact on farmers. The inflationary effects would be even more muted. Replacing $50 billion of Chinese imports with either our own production or imports from elsewhere would likely cost less than the tariff percentage. But let’s pretend we had to absorb the full 25 percent increase, $12.5 billion. This is a rounding error, seventy-one thousandths of 1 percent, well within the margin for error of any economic forecast. Following this same logic, it would take $180 billion of tit for tat to cause a 1 percentage point reduction in GDP. This is far more than the total of $130 billion in goods we export to them, and some of the food and lots of the technical products would not be readily replaceable. Therefore, there is no real-world circumstance where China could cut our GDP by that much. We simply don’t export enough to them." [Source] Remarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the National Press Club Headliners Luncheon. May 14, 2018
  • "But the retaliation lists published by China have created worry about a trade war. So, let’s analyze how far it might go. As the President has pointed out, China sells us far more than we sell them. Given the lopsided balance, they would run out of targets for tariffs much sooner than we would. Also, their retaliations would negatively impact their own economy as well as ours. China buys no products from us if they have cheaper alternatives. Therefore, the tariffs they impose will come at a cost to them. This would be particularly severe for China in agricultural products. China has 20 percent of the world’s population but only 11 percent of the arable land. They cannot feed themselves, so they must import to fill the gap, especially as their diets shift toward more protein content. Take soybeans as an example. It is true that China is our largest customer. But it also is true that Brazil accounts for a bit more than 50 percent of Chinese imports, while we are 30 percent. For Brazil to replace us, they would have to increase their exports to China by 60 percent. But if Brazil could ship that much more at competitive prices they would do so already. They have not been holding back just to help the United States. Brazil also has issues with climate and its transportation networks, which limit its ability to export materially more than it already does. Realistically then, to fill the additional Chinese demand, they would have to divert some soybeans now sold elsewhere. In return for a higher price to China, they might be willing to disrupt existing customer relationships. If they did so, the market they had formerly supplied would now open up for U.S. producers. At the end of the day, it would be, at best, a pyrrhic victory for China. Remember, food is a much higher percentage of income in China because incomes are so much lower. Therefore, the pain in China would be widespread." [SourceRemarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the National Press Club Headliners Luncheon. May 14, 2018
  • "China's announced decision to subsidize a dozen of the most promising technologies to become dominant in them by the year 2025 is a major problem. We welcome legitimate competition, but we cannot tolerate competition that is based on massive government subsidies and industrial cyber espionage." [SourceRemarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the National Press Club Headliners Luncheon. May 14, 2018
  • "China's massive growth in output following its admission into the WTO has been reflected in the loss of U.S. manufacturing jobs. It is not just automation that has cost factory jobs: It is also substitution of imports for domestic production. There are approximately 100 different ways in which China subsidizes its companies, even to the point of fostering continued expansion of unprofitable factories beyond the growth in demand. The dumping of products in overseas markets at subnormal prices is a significant cause of the recent crises in steel and aluminum. Once again, their behavior is very different from their words." [SourceRemarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the National Press Club Headliners Luncheon. May 14, 2018
  • "The combination of MFN [Most Favored Nation status] and Bound Tariff Rates prevent us from having reciprocal tariffs because, in most cases, our bound rate ceiling is at or near our very low MFN applied rate, while other nations have higher levels of both. They, therefore, have little incentive to negotiate. [...] For example, our MFN applied tariff on passenger cars is 2.5 percent, and so is our bound rate. [...] China is at 25 percent, 10 times our tariffs. Efforts over the last decade and a half to negotiate broad changes to these tariff rates have failed, in large part because of China’s unwillingness to make concessions commensurate with its significant role in the global economy. So, China, the world’s largest car market, is effectively closed to our exporters. This is not fair trade. This is not free trade!" [SourceRemarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the National Press Club Headliners Luncheon. May 14, 2018
  • During a hearing on the Commerce Department’s Fiscal Year 2019 Budget request, Senator Jerry Moran (KS) questioned Secretary Ross about ongoing trade negotiations with China and concerns stemming from retaliatory tariffs by China on the sorghum industry, which have affected Kansan farmers. [SourceClipped from CSPAN coverage of Secretary Ross on Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Request. May 10, 2018
  • During a hearing on the Commerce Department’s Fiscal Year 2019 Budget request, Senator Shelley Moore Capito (WV) questioned Secretary Ross about support for Chinese investment in West Virginia. [SourceClipped from CSPAN coverage of Secretary Ross on Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Request. May 10, 2018
  • During a hearing on the Commerce Department’s Fiscal Year 2019 Budget request, Senator Joe Manchin (WV) questioned Secretary Ross about the steel and aluminum tariffs enacted by the Trump administration, including negotiations along this regard with South Korea, and unfair trade practices undertaken by China. [SourceClipped from CSPAN coverage of Secretary Ross on Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Request. May 10, 2018
  • "At the invitation of Vice Premier Liu He and at the direction of President Donald J. Trump, the United States trade delegation, led by Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin and including Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Assistant to the President for Economic Policy Larry Kudlow, and Assistant to the President for Trade and Manufacturing Policy Peter Navarro, traveled to Beijing, and was joined there by Ambassador Terry Branstad. The delegation held frank discussions with Chinese officials on rebalancing the United States–China bilateral economic relationship, improving China’s protection of intellectual property, and identifying policies that unfairly enforce technology transfers.  The United States delegation affirmed that fair trade will lead to faster growth for the Chinese, United States, and world economies." [SourceStatement on the United States Trade Delegation's Visit to Beijing. May 4, 2018
  • "Today [May 1, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin from China and India. [...] Commerce preliminarily determined that exporters from China and India have sold PTFE resin in the United States at 69.34 to 208.16 percent and 18.49 percent less than fair value, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Polyetrafluoroethylene Resin from China and India. May 1, 2018
  • "U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross today [April 17, 2018] announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether certain steel wheels from China are being dumped in the United States and if producers in China are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] These AD and CVD investigations were initiated based on petitions filed by Accuride Corporation (Evansville, IN) and Maxion Wheels Akron LLC (Akron, OH) on March 27, 2018.  The alleged dumping margins range from 12.1 – 231.7 percent.  There are 56 subsidy programs alleged." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Certain Steel Wheels from China. April 17, 2018 
  • "Today [April 10, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of cold-drawn mechanical tubing from China, Germany, India, Italy, Korea, and Switzerland.  The Department also determined that critical circumstances exist for certain exporters/producers of cold-drawn mechanical tubing from Italy." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Cold-drawn Mechanical Tubing from China, Germany, India, Italy, Korea, and Switzerland. April 10, 2018
  • "Today [April 6, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determination in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of stainless steel flanges from China, finding that exporters from China received countervailable subsidies of 174.73 percent." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Determination on Stainless Steel Flanges from the People's Republic of China. April 6, 2018
  • "Today [April 5, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of tool chests and cabinets from China and Vietnam. [...] The Commerce Department determined that exporters from China have sold tool chests and cabinets in the United States at 97.11 percent to 244.29 percent at less than fair value.  Commerce determined that exporters from Vietnam have sold tool chests and cabinets in the United States at 327.17 percent at less than fair value." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Antidumping Duty Determinations on Tool Chests and Cabinets from China and Vietnam. April 5, 2018
  • "Today [March 22, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determination in the antidumping duty (AD) investigation of imports of carton-closing staples from the People’s Republic of China (China). [...] ommerce determined that exporters from China sold carton-closing staples in the United States at 115.65 – 263.40 percent less than fair value. As a result of today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of carton-closing staples based on the final rates. In 2016, imports of carton-closing staples from China were valued at an estimated $73.2 million." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Carton-Closing Staples from the People's Republic of China. March 22, 2018
  • "Today [March 22, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of stainless steel flanges from China and India. [...] The Commerce Department preliminarily determined that exporters from China and India have sold stainless steel flanges in the United States at 257.11 percent, and 18.10 to 145.25 percent less than fair value, respectively. As a result of today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of imports of stainless steel flanges from China and India based on these preliminary rates." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Stainless Steel Flanges from China and India. March 20, 2018
  • "Today [March 8, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determination in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of imports of forged steel fittings from China, finding that exporters in China received countervailable subsidies equal to 13.79 percent. [...] In 2016, imports of forged steel fittings from China were valued at an estimated $78.4 million." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determination on Forged Steel Fittings from China. March 8, 2018
  • "Today [February 27, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of imports of aluminum foil from the People’s Republic of China (China). [...] Commerce determined that exporters from China sold aluminum foil in the United States at 48.64 to 106.09 percent less than fair value. Commerce also determined that China is providing unfair subsidies to its producers of aluminum foil at rates of 17.14 to 80.97 percent." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping and Subsidization of Imports of Aluminum Foil From the People's Republic of China. February 27, 2018
  • "Today [February 22, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether rubber bands from China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are being dumped in the United States or if producers in China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] In the AD investigations, Commerce will determine whether imports of rubber bands from China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are being dumped in the U.S. market at less than fair value. In the CVD investigations, Commerce will determine whether Chinese, Sri Lankan, and Thai producers of rubber bands are receiving government subsidies." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Rubber Bands from China, Sri Lanka and Thailand. February 22, 2018
  • "Today [February 14, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determination in the antidumping duty (AD) investigation of imports of cast iron soil pipe fittings from China. [...] The Commerce Department preliminarily determined that exporters from China have sold cast iron soil pipe fittings in the United States at 68.37 to 109.95 percent less than fair value. As a result of today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of cast iron soil pipe fittings from China based on these preliminary rates. In 2016, imports of cast iron soil pipe fittings from China were valued at an estimated $8.6 million." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determination on Cast Iron Soil Pipe Fittings from the People's Republic of China. February 14, 2018
  • "Today [January 29, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of low melt polyester staple fiber from Korea and Taiwan. [...] The Commerce Department preliminarily determined that exporters from Korea and Taiwan have sold low melt polyester staple fiber in the United States at 0.00 to 16.48 percent and 52.00 percent less than fair value, respectively. As a result of today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of imports of low melt polyester staple fiber from Korea and Taiwan based on these preliminary rates. In 2016, imports of low melt polyester staple fiber from Korea and Taiwan were valued at an estimated $76.6 million and $26.8 million, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Low Melt Polyster Staple Fiber from Korea and Taiwan. January 29, 2018
  • "Today [January 17, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether certain plastic decorative ribbon from China is being dumped in the United States or if producers in China are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] The estimated dumping margins alleged by the petitioner range from 74.34 to 370.04 percent for China. The subsidy programs alleged include preferential lending, various tax incentives and export assistance, and the provision of plastic inputs by the government of China at less than adequate remuneration." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Certain Plastic Decorative Ribbon from China. January 17, 2018
  • "Today [January 17, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of stainless steel flanges from the People’s Republic of China (China) and India, finding that exporters in China and India received countervailable subsidies of 174.73 percent, and from 5.00 to 239.61 percent, respectively. The Commerce Department will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of stainless steel flanges from China and India based on these preliminary rates." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determinations on Stainless Steel Flanges from the People's Republic of China and India. January 17, 2018
  • "Today [January 17, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determinations in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of fine denier polyester staple fiber from the People’s Republic of China (China) and India, finding that exporters from China and India received countervailable subsidies of 41.73 to 47.55 percent and 9.50 to 25.28 percent, respectively. The Commerce Department will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China and India based on these final rates." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Determinations on Fine Denier Polyester Staple Fiber from China and India. January 17, 2018

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here

Human Rights & Democracy

 

 For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here

North Korea

 

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here

South China Sea

 

 For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here

Southeast Asia/ASEAN

  • "Today [June 12, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) investigations to determine whether steel propane cylinders from China, Taiwan, and Thailand are being dumped in the United States, and a new countervailing duty investigation to determine if producers in China are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] The alleged dumping margins are: China from 55.41 to 108.60 percent, Taiwan from 27.19 to 66.20 percent, and Thailand 47.67 to 122.48 percent. There are 18 alleged subsidy programs for China (two loan programs, three export credit/guarantee programs, five tax programs, three provision of goods for less than adequate remuneration programs, and five grant programs)." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty Investigations of Imports of Steel Propane Cylinders from China, Taiwan, and Thailand and a Countervailing Duty Investigation of Imports of Steel Propane Cylinders from China. June 12, 2018
  • "Today [May 30, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of citric acid and certain citrate salts from Belgium, Colombia, and Thailand, and its negative final determination in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of imports of citric acid and certain citrate salts from Thailand. Commerce determined that exporters from Belgium, Colombia, and Thailand have sold citric acid and certain citrate salts in the United States at 19.30 percent, 28.48 percent, and 6.47 – 15.71 percent less than fair value, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from Belguim, Colombia, and Thailand. May 30, 2018
  • "Today [May 28, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce announced final affirmative rulings that corrosion-resistant steel (CORE) and certain cold-rolled steel flat products (cold-rolled steel) imported from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Vietnam) produced from substrate originating in the People’s Republic of China (China) are circumventing the antidumping and countervailing duty (AD/CVD) orders on CORE and cold-rolled steel imported from China." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Circumvention Rulings on Steel from Vietnam. May 21, 2018
  • "Today [March 28, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether laminated woven sacks from Vietnam are being dumped in the United States or if producers in Vietnam are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] The alleged dumping margins range from 101.73 – 292.61 percent.  There are 19 subsidy programs alleged for Vietnam." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Laminated Woven Sacks from Vietnam. March 28, 2018
  • "Today [February 22, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether rubber bands from China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are being dumped in the United States or if producers in China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] In the AD investigations, Commerce will determine whether imports of rubber bands from China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are being dumped in the U.S. market at less than fair value. In the CVD investigations, Commerce will determine whether Chinese, Sri Lankan, and Thai producers of rubber bands are receiving government subsidies." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Rubber Bands from China, Sri Lanka and Thailand. February 22, 2018
  • "Today [February 21, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of biodiesel from Argentina and Indonesia. [...] The Commerce Department determined that exporters from Argentina and Indonesia have sold biodiesel in the United States at 60.44-86.41 percent and 92.52-276.65 percent less than fair value, respectively. As a result of today’s decisions, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of biodiesel from Argentina and Indonesia based on these final rates. In 2016, imports of biodiesel from Argentina and Indonesia were valued at an estimated $1.2 billion and $268 million, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Antidumping Duty Determinations on Biodiesel From Argentina and Indonesia. February 21, 2018
  • "The Commerce Department preliminarily determined that exporters from Belgium, Colombia, and Thailand have sold citric acid and certain citrate salts in the United States at 4.77 percent to 27.48 percent less than fair value. [...] In 2016, imports of citric acid and certain citrate salts from Belgium, Colombia, and Thailand were valued at an estimated $10.2 million, $26.5 million, and $49.9 million, respectively." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from Belguim, Colombia and Thailand. January 2, 2018

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here

Summits - APEC, East Asia (EAS), & US-ASEAN

 

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here

Trade & Investment

  • "Today [June 12, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) investigations to determine whether steel propane cylinders from China, Taiwan, and Thailand are being dumped in the United States, and a new countervailing duty investigation to determine if producers in China are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] The alleged dumping margins are: China from 55.41 to 108.60 percent, Taiwan from 27.19 to 66.20 percent, and Thailand 47.67 to 122.48 percent. There are 18 alleged subsidy programs for China (two loan programs, three export credit/guarantee programs, five tax programs, three provision of goods for less than adequate remuneration programs, and five grant programs)." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty Investigations of Imports of Steel Propane Cylinders from China, Taiwan, and Thailand and a Countervailing Duty Investigation of Imports of Steel Propane Cylinders from China. June 12, 2018
  • "The U.S. wireless industry supports more than 4.7 million American jobs and contributes almost a half-a-trillion dollars — $475 billion — annually to the economy. But we cannot be complacent. While the United States leads the world in the application of 4G wireless technology, China and South Korea are trying hard to position themselves to dominate the next generation of 5G. China is shaping up to be the biggest 5G market by 2022, and the Chinese government has targeted 5G to develop its indigenous industry and dominate global export markets. But, as you know from the recent publicity surrounding ZTE, they do not yet themselves have all of the necessary technology. It is estimated that 5G could create up to 3 million new American jobs, and generate $500 billion a year in economic growth. That would be a 2.5 percentage point increase in our GDP." [SourceRemarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the NTIA Spectrum Policy Symposium. June 12, 2018
  • "Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross today [June 7, 2018] announced that Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment Corporation, of Shenzhen, China (“ZTE Corporation”) and ZTE Kangxun Telecommunications Ltd. of Hi-New Shenzhen, China (“ZTE Kangxun”) (collectively, “ZTE”) has agreed to severe additional penalties and compliance measures to replace the U.S. Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) denial order imposed as a result of ZTE’s violations of its March 2017 settlement agreement.  Under the new agreement, ZTE must pay $1 billion and place an additional $400 million in suspended penalty money in escrow before BIS will remove ZTE from the Denied Persons List. These penalties are in addition to the $892 million in penalties ZTE has already paid to the U.S government under the March 2017 settlement agreement." [SourceSecretary Ross Announces $1.4 Billion ZTE Settlement; ZTE Board, Management Changes and Strictest BIS Compliance Requirements Ever. June 7, 2018 
  • "Today [June 6, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determination in the antidumping duty (AD) investigation of imports of stainless steel flanges from China. Commerce determined that exporters from China have sold stainless steel flanges in the United States at 257.11 percent less than fair value." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Antidumping Duty Determination on Stainless Steel Flanges from the People's Republic of China. June 6, 2018
  • "Over the weekend, Administration officials, led by Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, concluded a series of meetings in Beijing with a delegation from the government of China, as part of ongoing trade discussions. The meetings focused on reducing the United States’ trade deficit by facilitating the supply of agricultural and energy products to meet China’s growing consumption needs, which will help support growth and employment in the United States. The United States officials conveyed President Donald J. Trump’s clear goal for achieving a fair trading relationship with China. The delegations will now report back to receive guidance on the path forward." [SourceReadout of Discussions between Administration Officials and a Delegation from China Regarding the Trade Relationship between the United States and China. June 4, 2018
  • "Today [May 30, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of citric acid and certain citrate salts from Belgium, Colombia, and Thailand, and its negative final determination in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of imports of citric acid and certain citrate salts from Thailand. Commerce determined that exporters from Belgium, Colombia, and Thailand have sold citric acid and certain citrate salts in the United States at 19.30 percent, 28.48 percent, and 6.47 – 15.71 percent less than fair value, respectively." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from Belguim, Colombia, and Thailand. May 30, 2018
  • "Today [May 30, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative preliminary determination in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of imports of certain plastic decorative ribbon from China, finding that exporters in China received countervailable subsidies ranging from 12.81 percent to 94.67 percent. [...] In 2017, imports of certain plastic decorative ribbon from China were valued at an estimated $22.5 million." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determination on Imports of Certain Plastic Decorative Ribbon from China. May 30, 2018
  • "Today [May 24, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan. [...] In 2017, imports of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan were valued at an estimated $61.4 million, $23.7 million, $11.9 million, and $7.4 million, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Fine Denier Polyester Staple Fiber from China, India, Korea, and Taiwan. May 24, 2018
  • "The United States is looking at alternatives to the crippling sanctions threatening the survival of Chinese telecom giant ZTE, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told CNBC on Thursday. Ross said on 'Squawk Box' the U.S. is considering a plan to require compliance officers to be installed at ZTE, best known by consumers for selling smartphones. 'If we do decide to go forward with an alternative, what it literally would involve would be implanting people of our choosing into the company to constitute a compliance unit ... [which] would report back to the Department of Commerce,' he said. 'The whole key is enforcement.'" [SourceUS considering placing compliance officers inside China's ZTE: Commerce Secretary Ross. May 24, 2018
  • "Today [May 21, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce announced final affirmative rulings that corrosion-resistant steel (CORE) and certain cold-rolled steel flat products (cold-rolled steel) imported from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Vietnam) produced from substrate originating in the People’s Republic of China (China) are circumventing the antidumping and countervailing duty (AD/CVD) orders on CORE and cold-rolled steel imported from China." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Circumvention Rulings on Steel from Vietnam. May 21, 2018
  • "Successes include a dealer agreement between an American boat builder and a Chinese-based boat dealer looking to add a U.S. brand to their portfolio. [...] Several of our winners today count China as their number one international export market. In addition to the one mentioned earlier, there are five more:
    • Hydro-Thermal Corporation;
    • Flexo Concepts;
    • Santa Monica College;
    • Colorado State University; and
    • iTep International, a business that assesses English language skills in 51 countries.

    From day one, this Administration has been committed to leveling the playing field for businesses and organizations like yours. As you’ve seen in the news, we are working very hard to make China treat your companies more fairly and accept more imports." [SourceRemarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the President's E Awards Ceremony. May 21, 2018

  • "At the direction of President Donald J. Trump and President Xi Jinping, on May 17 and 18, 2018, the United States and China engaged in constructive consultations regarding trade in Washington, D.C. The United States delegation included Secretary of the Treasury Steven T. Mnuchin, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur L. Ross, and United States Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer. The Chinese delegation was led by State Council Vice Premier Liu He, Special Envoy of President Xi. There was a consensus on taking effective measures to substantially reduce the United States trade deficit in goods with China. To meet the growing consumption needs of the Chinese people and the need for high-quality economic development, China will significantly increase purchases of United States goods and services. This will help support growth and employment in the United States." [Source] Joint Statement of the United States and China Regarding Trade Consultations. May 19, 2018 
  • "The one sure thing is that President Trump meticulously honors his campaign promises, and key among them is making our trade relations with China much fairer. Some pundits have said this activity on trade will result in retaliation and undo the benefits of deregulation and the tax cuts. This is an exaggeration. If China retaliates with a 25 percent tariff on $50 billion of our exports, we would lose a major fraction of that volume but not all. For the sake of argument, assume that we lost all of that volume. The hit would be only $50 billion. This would be painful to the direct targets, but have less than a three-tenths of one percent impact on our $18 trillion economy, and it would partly be offset by the reduced imports of the goods on which we imposed our original 25 percent tariffs. Some portion of those would be produced domestically. Also, the President has directed the Agriculture Department to use all of its power to ameliorate the impact on farmers. The inflationary effects would be even more muted. Replacing $50 billion of Chinese imports with either our own production or imports from elsewhere would likely cost less than the tariff percentage. But let’s pretend we had to absorb the full 25 percent increase, $12.5 billion. This is a rounding error, seventy-one thousandths of 1 percent, well within the margin for error of any economic forecast. Following this same logic, it would take $180 billion of tit for tat to cause a 1 percentage point reduction in GDP. This is far more than the total of $130 billion in goods we export to them, and some of the food and lots of the technical products would not be readily replaceable. Therefore, there is no real-world circumstance where China could cut our GDP by that much. We simply don’t export enough to them." [SourceRemarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the National Press Club Headliners Luncheon. May 14, 2018
  • "But the retaliation lists published by China have created worry about a trade war. So, let’s analyze how far it might go. As the President has pointed out, China sells us far more than we sell them. Given the lopsided balance, they would run out of targets for tariffs much sooner than we would. Also, their retaliations would negatively impact their own economy as well as ours. China buys no products from us if they have cheaper alternatives. Therefore, the tariffs they impose will come at a cost to them. This would be particularly severe for China in agricultural products. China has 20 percent of the world’s population but only 11 percent of the arable land. They cannot feed themselves, so they must import to fill the gap, especially as their diets shift toward more protein content. Take soybeans as an example. It is true that China is our largest customer. But it also is true that Brazil accounts for a bit more than 50 percent of Chinese imports, while we are 30 percent. For Brazil to replace us, they would have to increase their exports to China by 60 percent. But if Brazil could ship that much more at competitive prices they would do so already. They have not been holding back just to help the United States. Brazil also has issues with climate and its transportation networks, which limit its ability to export materially more than it already does. Realistically then, to fill the additional Chinese demand, they would have to divert some soybeans now sold elsewhere. In return for a higher price to China, they might be willing to disrupt existing customer relationships. If they did so, the market they had formerly supplied would now open up for U.S. producers. At the end of the day, it would be, at best, a pyrrhic victory for China. Remember, food is a much higher percentage of income in China because incomes are so much lower. Therefore, the pain in China would be widespread." [SourceRemarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the National Press Club Headliners Luncheon. May 14, 2018
  • "China's announced decision to subsidize a dozen of the most promising technologies to become dominant in them by the year 2025 is a major problem. We welcome legitimate competition, but we cannot tolerate competition that is based on massive government subsidies and industrial cyber espionage." [SourceRemarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the National Press Club Headliners Luncheon. May 14, 2018
  • "China's massive growth in output following its admission into the WTO has been reflected in the loss of U.S. manufacturing jobs. It is not just automation that has cost factory jobs: It is also substitution of imports for domestic production. There are approximately 100 different ways in which China subsidizes its companies, even to the point of fostering continued expansion of unprofitable factories beyond the growth in demand. The dumping of products in overseas markets at subnormal prices is a significant cause of the recent crises in steel and aluminum. Once again, their behavior is very different from their words." [SourceRemarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the National Press Club Headliners Luncheon. May 14, 2018
  • "The combination of MFN [Most Favored Nation status] and Bound Tariff Rates prevent us from having reciprocal tariffs because, in most cases, our bound rate ceiling is at or near our very low MFN applied rate, while other nations have higher levels of both. They, therefore, have little incentive to negotiate. [...] For example, our MFN applied tariff on passenger cars is 2.5 percent, and so is our bound rate. [...] China is at 25 percent, 10 times our tariffs. Efforts over the last decade and a half to negotiate broad changes to these tariff rates have failed, in large part because of China’s unwillingness to make concessions commensurate with its significant role in the global economy. So, China, the world’s largest car market, is effectively closed to our exporters. This is not fair trade. This is not free trade!" [SourceRemarks by Secretary Wilbur L. Ross at the National Press Club Headliners Luncheon. May 14, 2018
  • During a hearing on the Commerce Department’s Fiscal Year 2019 Budget request, Senator Jerry Moran (KS) questioned Secretary Ross about ongoing trade negotiations with China and concerns stemming from retaliatory tariffs by China on the sorghum industry, which have affected Kansan farmers. [SourceClipped from CSPAN coverage of Secretary Ross on Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Request. May 10, 2018
  • During a hearing on the Commerce Department’s Fiscal Year 2019 Budget request, Senator Shelley Moore Capito (WV) questioned Secretary Ross about support for Chinese investment in West Virginia. [SourceClipped from CSPAN coverage of Secretary Ross on Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Request. May 10, 2018
  • During a hearing on the Commerce Department’s Fiscal Year 2019 Budget request, Senator Joe Manchin (WV) questioned Secretary Ross about the steel and aluminum tariffs enacted by the Trump administration, including negotiations along this regard with South Korea, and unfair trade practices undertaken by China. [SourceClipped from CSPAN coverage of Secretary Ross on Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Request. May 10, 2018
  • "At the invitation of Vice Premier Liu He and at the direction of President Donald J. Trump, the United States trade delegation, led by Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin and including Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Assistant to the President for Economic Policy Larry Kudlow, and Assistant to the President for Trade and Manufacturing Policy Peter Navarro, traveled to Beijing, and was joined there by Ambassador Terry Branstad. The delegation held frank discussions with Chinese officials on rebalancing the United States–China bilateral economic relationship, improving China’s protection of intellectual property, and identifying policies that unfairly enforce technology transfers.  The United States delegation affirmed that fair trade will lead to faster growth for the Chinese, United States, and world economies." [SourceStatement on the United States Trade Delegation's Visit to Beijing. May 4, 2018
  • "Today [May 1, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin from China and India. [...] Commerce preliminarily determined that exporters from China and India have sold PTFE resin in the United States at 69.34 to 208.16 percent and 18.49 percent less than fair value, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Polyetrafluoroethylene Resin from China and India. May 1, 2018
  • "Today [April 30, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) resin from Brazil, the Republic of Indonesia (Indonesia), the Republic of Korea (Korea), Pakistan, and Taiwan. [...] In 2016, imports of PET resin from Brazil, Indonesia, Korea, Pakistan, and Taiwan were valued at an estimated $51.7 million, $35.7 million, $24 million, $34.1 million, and $109.8 million, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Polyethylene Terephthalate Resin from Brazil, Indonesia, Korea, Pakistan and Taiwan. April 30, 2018
  • "U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross today [April 17, 2018] announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether certain steel wheels from China are being dumped in the United States and if producers in China are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] These AD and CVD investigations were initiated based on petitions filed by Accuride Corporation (Evansville, IN) and Maxion Wheels Akron LLC (Akron, OH) on March 27, 2018.  The alleged dumping margins range from 12.1 – 231.7 percent.  There are 56 subsidy programs alleged." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Certain Steel Wheels from China. April 17, 2018 
  • "Today [April 10, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of cold-drawn mechanical tubing from China, Germany, India, Italy, Korea, and Switzerland.  The Department also determined that critical circumstances exist for certain exporters/producers of cold-drawn mechanical tubing from Italy." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Cold-drawn Mechanical Tubing from China, Germany, India, Italy, Korea, and Switzerland. April 10, 2018
  • "Today [April 6, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determination in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of stainless steel flanges from China, finding that exporters from China received countervailable subsidies of 174.73 percent." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Determination on Stainless Steel Flanges from the People's Republic of China. April 6, 2018
  • "Today [April 5, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of tool chests and cabinets from China and Vietnam. [...] The Commerce Department determined that exporters from China have sold tool chests and cabinets in the United States at 97.11 percent to 244.29 percent at less than fair value.  Commerce determined that exporters from Vietnam have sold tool chests and cabinets in the United States at 327.17 percent at less than fair value." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Antidumping Duty Determinations on Tool Chests and Cabinets from China and Vietnam. April 5, 2018
  • "Today [March 28, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether laminated woven sacks from Vietnam are being dumped in the United States or if producers in Vietnam are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] The alleged dumping margins range from 101.73 – 292.61 percent.  There are 19 subsidy programs alleged for Vietnam." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Laminated Woven Sacks from Vietnam. March 28, 2018
  • "Today [March 22, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determination in the antidumping duty (AD) investigation of imports of carton-closing staples from the People’s Republic of China (China). [...] ommerce determined that exporters from China sold carton-closing staples in the United States at 115.65 – 263.40 percent less than fair value. As a result of today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of carton-closing staples based on the final rates. In 2016, imports of carton-closing staples from China were valued at an estimated $73.2 million." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping of Imports of Carton-Closing Staples from the People's Republic of China. March 22, 2018
  • "Today [March 20, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of stainless steel flanges from China and India. [...] The Commerce Department preliminarily determined that exporters from China and India have sold stainless steel flanges in the United States at 257.11 percent, and 18.10 to 145.25 percent less than fair value, respectively. As a result of today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of imports of stainless steel flanges from China and India based on these preliminary rates." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Stainless Steel Flanges from China and India. March 20, 2018
  • "Today [March 20, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of imports of carbon and alloy steel wire rod from Italy and Turkey and AD investigations of carbon and alloy steel wire rod from Korea, Spain, and the United Kingdom. [...] In 2016, imports of carbon and alloy steel wire rod from Italy, Korea, Spain, Turkey, and the United Kingdom were valued at an estimated $12.2 million, $45.6 million, $40.7 million, $41.4 million, and $20.5 million, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping and Subsidization of Imports of Carbon and Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Italy, Korea, Spain, Turkey and the United Kingdom. March 20, 2018
  • "Today [March 8, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determination in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of imports of forged steel fittings from China, finding that exporters in China received countervailable subsidies equal to 13.79 percent. [...] In 2016, imports of forged steel fittings from China were valued at an estimated $78.4 million." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determination on Forged Steel Fittings from China. March 8, 2018
  • "Today [March 1, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determination in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigation of imports of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin from India, finding that exporters in India received countervailable subsidies of 3.90 percent." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determination on Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin from India. March 1, 2018 
  • "Today [March 1, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of imports of silicon metal from Australia and Brazil, an AD investigation of silicon metal imports from Norway, and a CVD investigation of silicon metal imports from Kazakhstan. [...] The Commerce Department determined that exporters from Australia, Brazil, and Norway have sold silicon metal in the United States at 41.73 – 51.28 percent, 68.97 – 134.92 percent, and 3.22 percent less than fair value, respectively. Commerce also determined that Australia, Brazil, and Kazakhstan are providing countervailable subsidies to its producers of silicon metal at rates ranging from 14.78 percent, 2.44 – 52.51 percent, and 100.00 percent, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping and Subsidization of Imports of Silicon Metal from Australia, Brazil, Kazakhstan, and Norway. March 1, 2018
  • "Today [February 27, 2018], the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of imports of aluminum foil from the People’s Republic of China (China). [...] Commerce determined that exporters from China sold aluminum foil in the United States at 48.64 to 106.09 percent less than fair value. Commerce also determined that China is providing unfair subsidies to its producers of aluminum foil at rates of 17.14 to 80.97 percent." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping and Subsidization of Imports of Aluminum Foil From the People's Republic of China. February 27, 2018
  • "Today [February 22, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether rubber bands from China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are being dumped in the United States or if producers in China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] In the AD investigations, Commerce will determine whether imports of rubber bands from China, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are being dumped in the U.S. market at less than fair value. In the CVD investigations, Commerce will determine whether Chinese, Sri Lankan, and Thai producers of rubber bands are receiving government subsidies." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Rubber Bands from China, Sri Lanka and Thailand. February 22, 2018
  • "Today [February 21, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of biodiesel from Argentina and Indonesia. [...] The Commerce Department determined that exporters from Argentina and Indonesia have sold biodiesel in the United States at 60.44-86.41 percent and 92.52-276.65 percent less than fair value, respectively. As a result of today’s decisions, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of biodiesel from Argentina and Indonesia based on these final rates. In 2016, imports of biodiesel from Argentina and Indonesia were valued at an estimated $1.2 billion and $268 million, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Antidumping Duty Determinations on Biodiesel From Argentina and Indonesia. February 21, 2018
  • "Today [February 14, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determination in the antidumping duty (AD) investigation of imports of cast iron soil pipe fittings from China. [...] The Commerce Department preliminarily determined that exporters from China have sold cast iron soil pipe fittings in the United States at 68.37 to 109.95 percent less than fair value. As a result of today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of cast iron soil pipe fittings from China based on these preliminary rates. In 2016, imports of cast iron soil pipe fittings from China were valued at an estimated $8.6 million." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determination on Cast Iron Soil Pipe Fittings from the People's Republic of China. February 14, 2018
  • "Today [January 29, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) investigations of imports of low melt polyester staple fiber from Korea and Taiwan. [...] The Commerce Department preliminarily determined that exporters from Korea and Taiwan have sold low melt polyester staple fiber in the United States at 0.00 to 16.48 percent and 52.00 percent less than fair value, respectively. As a result of today’s decision, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to collect cash deposits from importers of imports of low melt polyester staple fiber from Korea and Taiwan based on these preliminary rates. In 2016, imports of low melt polyester staple fiber from Korea and Taiwan were valued at an estimated $76.6 million and $26.8 million, respectively." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Low Melt Polyster Staple Fiber from Korea and Taiwan. January 29, 2018
  • "Today [January 17, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the initiation of new antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations to determine whether certain plastic decorative ribbon from China is being dumped in the United States or if producers in China are receiving unfair subsidies. [...] The estimated dumping margins alleged by the petitioner range from 74.34 to 370.04 percent for China. The subsidy programs alleged include preferential lending, various tax incentives and export assistance, and the provision of plastic inputs by the government of China at less than adequate remuneration." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Initiates Antidumping Duty and Countervailing Duty Investigations of Imports of Certain Plastic Decorative Ribbon from China. January 17, 2018
  • "Today [January 17, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative preliminary determinations in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of stainless steel flanges from the People’s Republic of China (China) and India, finding that exporters in China and India received countervailable subsidies of 174.73 percent, and from 5.00 to 239.61 percent, respectively. The Commerce Department will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of stainless steel flanges from China and India based on these preliminary rates." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Determinations on Stainless Steel Flanges from the People's Republic of China and India. January 17, 2018
  • "Today [January 17, 2018], U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determinations in the countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of fine denier polyester staple fiber from the People’s Republic of China (China) and India, finding that exporters from China and India received countervailable subsidies of 41.73 to 47.55 percent and 9.50 to 25.28 percent, respectively. The Commerce Department will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of fine denier polyester staple fiber from China and India based on these final rates." [SourceU.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Final Determinations on Fine Denier Polyester Staple Fiber from China and India. January 17, 2018
  • "The Commerce Department preliminarily determined that exporters from Belgium, Colombia, and Thailand have sold citric acid and certain citrate salts in the United States at 4.77 percent to 27.48 percent less than fair value. [...] In 2016, imports of citric acid and certain citrate salts from Belgium, Colombia, and Thailand were valued at an estimated $10.2 million, $26.5 million, and $49.9 million, respectively." [Source] U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determinations on Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from Belguim, Colombia and Thailand. January 2, 2018

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here

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Methodology: Policy materials and quotations from Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, Jr. are limited to after January 18, 2017 when he underwent a confirmation hearing before the Senate. Should any quotations before the period be deemed relevant they will be indicated by an asterisk (*) after the date. In all cases, these additional quotations were made within the year prior to the start of the Trump Administration. Flag icons that indicate which countries members of the Trump administration have traveled to are provided by Freepik, accessed through www.flaticon.com.

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