Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and US-Asia Pacific Relations

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Coordinator: Sarah Wang. For methodology, click here.

This resource will track statements, developments, visits and other interactions in US-Asia Pacific relations given or undertaken by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. 

To view quotations, debriefs of interactions with Asia Pacific leaders, and media sorted by topic, scroll down or use the links below. Secretary Tillerson in 2017, visit this page for a historical list

Travel to Asia Pacific Countries Asia Pacific Leaders Asia Pacific Allies & Partners
China/Taiwan Human Rights & Democracy North Korea
South China Sea Southeast Asia/ASEAN Summits - APEC, East Asia (EAS), & US-ASEAN
Trade & Investnment    

To view the positions of President Trump, Vice President Pence, Secretary of Defense Mattis, Secretary of Commerce Ross, and Secretary of State Tillerson on various issues in US-Asia Pacific relations, click here.

To view quotations, interviews, and policy documents given by and interactions with Asia Pacific leaders undertaken by President Trump, Vice President Pence, Secretary of Defense Mattis, and Secretary of Commerce Ross use the links below.

President Donald J. Trump Vice President Mike Pence Secretary of Defense James Mattis
Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, Jr.    

To examine Asian reactions to ongoing developments in US-Asia relations and the US 2016 Presidential election, click here.

To explore previous quotations, views on Asia Pacific issues, and other connections to Asia from President Trump, Vice President Pence, and other candidates in the 2016 Presidential Election, click here.

Travel to Asia Pacific Countries

 

For a historical list of countries traveled to in 2017, click here

Asia Pacific Leaders

 

For a historical list of meetings with Asia Pacific leaders in 2017, click here

Asia Pacific Allies & Partners

  • "On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I wish people around the world good health, peace, and prosperity on the occasion of the Lunar New Year on February 16, 2018. Let us endeavor to continue to foster closer cooperation, promote greater understanding, and build a better world for each other and for our children. We hope that the Year of the Dog will bring even greater success and opportunity for all." [Source] Celebrating the Lunar New Year. February 14, 2018
  • "Please accept my best wishes as you and the people of Mongolia celebrate Tsagaan Sar on February 16, 2018. The United States is proud to count Mongolia as a close friend and partner, and we look forward to deepening the relationship between the American and Mongolian peoples in the year to come. I wish Mongolia every success in the year of the Earth Dog. Happy Tsagaan Sar!" [Source] Mongolian Lunar New Year (Tsagaan Sar). February 14, 2018
  • "I want to welcome State Councilor Yang Jiechi of China back to the State Department. We’ve had many, many good discussions, and we’re going to continue these very important discussions about U.S.-China relations. And I very much warmly, warmly welcome him here. Thank you. Thank you, State Councilor." [Source] Remarks With Chinese State Councilor Yang Jiechi Before Their Meeting. February 8, 2018
  • "I also want to note our appreciation for Colombia’s full support on our concerns about the nuclear weapons programs of North Korea and the DPRK. And we appreciate that Colombia sent a representative to the Vancouver meeting in Canada this past month, and it was important participation on the part of Colombia to support that international effort and that joint statement, which was very clear as to the desire of the entire international community that North Korea denuclearize and give up their nuclear weapons." [Source] Joint Press Availability With Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos. February 6, 2018
  • "Well, I’m not sure that the South or the U.S. expected to get anything out of this. In terms of the South Koreans allowing the North Koreans to participate, and with the approval of the IOC as well, our understanding is that what North Korea is receiving from the South Koreans is no more than what all the participants who are attending the Olympics are receiving. Also, the North – the South Koreans have been using some training facilities in the North, so our understanding is this is on a reciprocal basis and there is no gain, there is no cash or anything being paid to the North Koreans for their participation in the Olympics. So it’s very much just on an equal basis. And I think in terms of the military demonstrations that the North Koreans may have, this is a military parade, is what we understand. We see a lot of these great parades they have in the square there in Pyongyang. And as to our military exercises, we agreed very early on that we did not want to detract from South Korea’s needs to ensure they could provide full security during the conduct of the Olympics, and so we --[...] No, this was really to allow all South Korea’s security and military assets to be focused on – just like any nation that would host an Olympics. It’s a big security challenge, and we didn’t need to be running military exercises that require them to divert resources. That’s the reason we said we would postpone these till the Olympics are over." [Source] Interview with Rich Edson of Fox News. February 6, 2018
  • "On behalf of the people of the United States of America, I would like to extend heartfelt congratulations to the people of New Zealand as you mark the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi on February 6. We count New Zealand as one of our closest partners; the strong ties between our peoples are at the heart of our relationship. More New Zealanders and Americans than ever before travel between our two countries in search of academic advancement, business opportunities, and new friendships. In turn, our governments work together across a host of areas including advancing democratic principles, promoting security in troubled corners of the globe, and pushing the boundaries of scientific exploration. We value our warm relationship with New Zealand and look forward to working together to accomplish even more in the years ahead. I wish all New Zealanders around the world a proud Waitangi Day." [Source] New Zealand Waitangi Day. February 4, 2018
  • "On behalf of President Trump and the people of the United States, I am thrilled to congratulate the people of Australia as you celebrate Australia Day on January 26, 2018. The United States and Australia share deep bonds of friendship that are truly unique. Our alliance is a stabilizing force in the region and beyond that has provided for our mutual security and prosperity. Our ties continue to strengthen as business, scientific, and cultural connections flourish. The United States remains committed to our unbreakable alliance and our powerful bonds of friendship and mateship, based on shared values and shared aspirations for the future. As you celebrate Australia Day, know that the people of the United States celebrate with you as your friend, partner, and ally." [Source] Australia National Day. January 24, 2018
  • "Well, first let me address the U.S. trilateral relationship with Japan and the Republic of Korea. And that is a relationship that’s grounded in shared security interest, and the commitments among all three of us to that – to that trilateral arrangement is ironclad. It’s – it is in no way changed from what it historically has been. The issue of the comfort women is one that – it’s a very emotional issue for both sides, and it’s one that only they can resolve. And our role has been simply to encourage them to deal with the issue, do not let that issue stand in the way of the greater security threats that are common to all of us. And we know that there’s more that needs to be done. I think there have been helpful statements actually made by both sides recognizing that it is a difficult issue for both countries to deal with, and we hope ultimately they can move beyond that. We know it’s not easy for them. In terms of how it impacts our ability to strengthen the trilateral relationship, it’s not been an obstacle in that relationship around our shared security interests." [SourceRemarks with Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland at a Press Availability. January 16, 2018
  • "On behalf of the United States of America, I offer congratulations to President Htin Kyaw and the people of Myanmar on the occasion of Myanmar’s Independence Day on January 4, 2018. For decades, the United States has stood with the people of Myanmar in their pursuit of peace, freedom, and justice. We remain committed to helping advance Myanmar’s democratic transition, and continue to support the civilian government in efforts to end decades of conflict; strengthen respect for human rights, transparency, and rule of law; and foster inclusive economic development. At the same time, we urge authorities to take further steps to ensure everyone has full and equal access to the opportunities and the benefits of a democratic society. We wish all of Myanmar’s people peace, security, and prosperity in the coming year." [Source] Burmese (Myanmar) National Day. January 2, 2018

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here

China/Taiwan

  • "What I think we got a common understanding with China is that North Korea represents a serious threat to China as well. And we’ve been very clear with them that they are going to have an important role to play once we get to the negotiating table." [SourceInterview With Margaret Brennan of CBS 60 Minutes. February 18, 2018
  • "On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I wish people around the world good health, peace, and prosperity on the occasion of the Lunar New Year on February 16, 2018. Let us endeavor to continue to foster closer cooperation, promote greater understanding, and build a better world for each other and for our children. We hope that the Year of the Dog will bring even greater success and opportunity for all." [SourceCelebrating the Lunar New Year. February 14, 2018
  • "I want to welcome State Councilor Yang Jiechi of China back to the State Department. We’ve had many, many good discussions, and we’re going to continue these very important discussions about U.S.-China relations. And I very much warmly, warmly welcome him here. Thank you. Thank you, State Councilor." [Source] Remarks With Chinese State Councilor Yang Jiechi Before Their Meeting. February 8, 2018

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here.

Human Rights & Democracy

  • "Well, first let me address the U.S. trilateral relationship with Japan and the Republic of Korea. And that is a relationship that’s grounded in shared security interest, and the commitments among all three of us to that – to that trilateral arrangement is ironclad. It’s – it is in no way changed from what it historically has been. The issue of the comfort women is one that – it’s a very emotional issue for both sides, and it’s one that only they can resolve. And our role has been simply to encourage them to deal with the issue, do not let that issue stand in the way of the greater security threats that are common to all of us. And we know that there’s more that needs to be done. I think there have been helpful statements actually made by both sides recognizing that it is a difficult issue for both countries to deal with, and we hope ultimately they can move beyond that. We know it’s not easy for them. In terms of how it impacts our ability to strengthen the trilateral relationship, it’s not been an obstacle in that relationship around our shared security interests." [SourceRemarks with Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland at a Press Availability. January 16, 2018

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here.

North Korea

  • "I’m going to use all the time available to me. Our diplomatic efforts will continue until that first bomb drops. My job is to never have a reason for the first bomb to drop. And we don’t know precisely how much time is left on the clock." [Source] Interview With Margaret Brennan of CBS 60 Minutes. February 18, 2018
  • "We’re not using a carrot to convince them to talk. We’re using large sticks, and that is what they need to understand. This pressure campaign is putting – is having its bite on North Korea, its revenue streams. It’s having a bite on its military programs." [SourceInterview With Margaret Brennan of CBS 60 Minutes. February 18, 2018
  • "What I think we got a common understanding with China is that North Korea represents a serious threat to China as well. And we’ve been very clear with them that they are going to have an important role to play once we get to the negotiating table." [SourceInterview With Margaret Brennan of CBS 60 Minutes. February 18, 2018
  • "We also want to recognize and thank Kuwait for its contribution to the maximum pressure campaign on North Korea to encourage North Korea to take a different path, to give up its nuclear weapons, and engage in dialogue and discussions with the United States and others to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula." [Source] Press Availability With Kuwati Foreign Minister Sheikh Sabah al-Khalid al-Sabah. February 13, 2018
  • "Well, as to – as to the Vice President’s comments about potentially having talks [with North Korea] and whether it’s the start of a diplomatic process, I think it’s too early to judge. As we’ve said for some time, it’s really up to the North Koreans to decide when they’re ready to engage with us in a sincere way, a meaningful way. They know what has to be on the table for conversations. We’ve said for some time that I think it’s important that we have – we’re going to need to have some discussions that precede any form of negotiation to determine whether the parties are, in fact, ready to engage in something this meaningful, in order for us to then put together the construct of a negotiation. So we’ll just have to wait and see." [Source] Press Availability With Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry. February 12, 2018
  • "I also want to note our appreciation for Colombia’s full support on our concerns about the nuclear weapons programs of North Korea and the DPRK. And we appreciate that Colombia sent a representative to the Vancouver meeting in Canada this past month, and it was important participation on the part of Colombia to support that international effort and that joint statement, which was very clear as to the desire of the entire international community that North Korea denuclearize and give up their nuclear weapons." [SourceJoint Press Availability With Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos. February 6, 2018
  • "Well, I’m not sure that the South or the U.S. expected to get anything out of this. In terms of the South Koreans allowing the North Koreans to participate, and with the approval of the IOC as well, our understanding is that what North Korea is receiving from the South Koreans is no more than what all the participants who are attending the Olympics are receiving. Also, the North – the South Koreans have been using some training facilities in the North, so our understanding is this is on a reciprocal basis and there is no gain, there is no cash or anything being paid to the North Koreans for their participation in the Olympics. So it’s very much just on an equal basis. And I think in terms of the military demonstrations that the North Koreans may have, this is a military parade, is what we understand. We see a lot of these great parades they have in the square there in Pyongyang. And as to our military exercises, we agreed very early on that we did not want to detract from South Korea’s needs to ensure they could provide full security during the conduct of the Olympics, and so we --[...] No, this was really to allow all South Korea’s security and military assets to be focused on – just like any nation that would host an Olympics. It’s a big security challenge, and we didn’t need to be running military exercises that require them to divert resources. That’s the reason we said we would postpone these till the Olympics are over." [SourceInterview with Rich Edson of Fox News. February 6, 2018
  • "Well, that’s a choice the [North Korean] regime is making. The regime gets to decide how they want to allocate their available resources [in light of pressure caused by sanctions], so it’s a choice they’re making. We know any sanctions regime, it doesn’t matter which country, when you impose sanctions you are limiting resources available to them, and then it’s up to that government to decide how they want to allocate the available resources. [...]  It’s an unacceptable outcome that Kim’s making that choice, and we’re not going to take any responsibility for the fact that he’s choosing to make his own people suffer. [...] Well, our experience with ensuring that the aid actually goes to the people who need it is not particularly good. And so countries will have to make their own choice, but we would be very skeptical that that aid that goes into the country will necessarily relieve the suffering of the people." [Source] Remarks to Traveling Press. January 17, 2017
  • "I think our approach is, in terms of having North Korea choose the correct step, is to present them with that is the best option, that talks are the best option, that when they look at the – a military situation, that’s not a good outcome for them. When they look at the economic impact of ever-growing sanctions and the pressure campaign, there is no – there is no end to that. And I think for North Korea and the regime, what we hope they are able to realize is the situation only gets worse. It gets worse with each step they take, it gets worse with time. And that is not working to their objectives of wanting to be secure. They are not more secure. They are becoming less secure. They certainly are not more economically prosperous. They’re becoming less prosperous. And we do think that that message is beginning to – I don’t want to say resonate with them, but there is a realization with them that the rest of the world is quite resolute in this stand we’re taking that we will never accept them as a nuclear power. And so it’s time to talk, but they have to take the step that says they want to talk." [Source] Remarks with Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland at a Press Availability. January 16, 2018
  • "With respect to whether Americans should be concerned about a war with North Korea, I think it’s – we all need to be very sober and clear-eyed about the current situation. As North Korea has continued to make significant advances in both its nuclear weapons, the lethality of those weapons as demonstrated by their last thermonuclear test as well as the continued progress they’ve made in their intercontinental ballistic missile systems, we have to recognize that that threat is growing. And if North Korea is not – does not choose the pathway of engagement, discussion, negotiation, then they themselves will trigger an option." [SourceRemarks with Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland at a Press Availability. January 16, 2018
  • "The goal of the maximum pressure campaign is and always has been to move North Korea towards credible negotiations on denuclearization. And our diplomatic talks have always been backed up by a strong and resolute military option. Today, however, we had constructive discussions about how to push our diplomatic efforts forward and prepare for the prospects of talks. But productive negotiations require a credible negotiating partner. North Korea has not yet shown themselves to be that credible partner. The United States has always been open to clear messages that North Korea – and we have sent clear messages to North Korea that we are ready for serious negotiations. North Koreans know our channels are open, and they know where to find us. But a sustained cessation of North Korea’s threatening behavior is necessary – is a necessary indicator of whether the regime is truly ready to pursue a peaceful, diplomatic resolution to the security threat that it has created." [SourceRemarks with Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland at a Press Availability. January 16, 2018
  • "Our unity and our common cause with others in the region, most particularly China and Russia, will remain intact despite North Korea’s frequent attempts to divide us and sow dissension. Today we discussed ways to further increase pressure on North Korea through more effective sanctions implementation and compliance, and countries came forward with proposals on how they intend to do that. We agreed that the need for UN member-states, especially China and Russia, to fully implement agreed-upon sanctions is essential to their success." [SourceRemarks with Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland at a Press Availability. January 16, 2018
  • "Our nations repeated a unified message that we have sent the regime before: We will not accept a nuclear-armed North Korea. All of us share one policy and one goal, and that is the complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula." [SourceRemarks with Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland at a Press Availability. January 16, 2018
  • "We recognize that no one action or resolution will compel North Korea to give up its nuclear program, but if all countries cut off or significantly limit their economic and diplomatic engagements with North Korea, the sum total of our individual national efforts will increase the chances of a negotiated resolution. Our nations desire a future for North Korea, but the ultimate responsibility for producing that new future lies with North Korea. Only by abandoning its current path can North Korea achieve the security and stability it desires and a prosperous future for its people." [Source] Remarks With Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland, South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha, Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono, and UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson At the Vancouver Foreign Ministers' Meeting On Security and Stability on the Korean Peninsula. January 16, 2018
  • "My point is this: North Korea’s willingness to launch missiles at any time presents a threat to people of all nationalities in the region’s air space each day. Based on its past recklessness, we cannot expect North Korea to have any regard for what might get in the way of one of its missiles or part of a missile breaking apart. This is to say nothing of potential technological errors associated with a launch that could result in disaster. Of course, this is hardly the only threat or likeliest threat posed by North Korean missiles. Twice last year, North Korea launched missiles over Japan, which could have fallen on population centers. The North Korean threat has many dimensions, all of which must be countered. The regime has shown a recklessness among the nations of the world. Based on its actions now, we can see what North Korea may very well do later if it obtains complete nuclear and missile delivery capabilities." [SourceRemarks With Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland, South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha, Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono, and UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson At the Vancouver Foreign Ministers' Meeting On Security and Stability on the Korean Peninsula. January 16, 2018
  • "The object of negotiations, if and when we get there, is the complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization of North Korea. All nations here today are united on that goal. Let me clear: We will not allow North Korea to drive a wedge through our resolve or our solidarity. We reject a “freeze-for-freeze” approach in which legitimate defensive military exercises are placed on the same level of equivalency as the DPRK’s unlawful actions." [SourceRemarks With Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland, South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha, Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono, and UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson At the Vancouver Foreign Ministers' Meeting On Security and Stability on the Korean Peninsula. January 16, 2018
  • "And I think as President Trump highlighted so well in his remarks to the Republic of Korea’s General Assembly in November, the differences between freedom and democracy for the people of the Republic of Korea is striking when compared to the conditions of life for the people who live under the tyranny of the regime in North Korea. And it is only a threat of this nature, a serious nuclear weapons threat, that would unite what were once enemies – the sending states with China – in a common goal to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula. And the sending states stand shoulder-to-shoulder with China, with the Republic of Korea, with Japan, with Russia, and is now joined by the entire international community in saying to the regime in North Korea we cannot and will not accept you as a nuclear state." [SourceRemarks With Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland, South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha, Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono, and UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson At the Vancouver Foreign Ministers' Meeting On Security and Stability on the Korean Peninsula. January 16, 2018
  • "I think the rhetoric that North Korea understands is while it is our objective – and the President has been very clear – to achieve a denuclearization through diplomatic efforts, those diplomatic efforts are backed by a strong military option if necessary. That is not the first choice, and the President has been clear that’s not his first choice. But it is important that North Korea, as well as other regional players, understand how high the stakes are in an effort to ensure our diplomatic efforts are fully supported. And I think to date, the diplomatic efforts have been supported very well in the international community. If you look at the three UN Security Council resolutions on sanctions, the participation in those sanctions and a number of countries going well beyond the Security Council resolutions and imposing unilateral actions on their own, both economic as well as diplomatic, I think it is a recognition that the President has demonstrated to the world how high the stakes are. That’s why we must achieve a diplomatic outcome. But the North Koreans have to understand that, and they have to understand that the penalties to them will continue and will only grow more severe in terms of sanctions actions and other actions until they do get on a pathway to achieve that objective that the entire world hopes to achieve." [Source] Interview With Elise Labott of CNN. January 5, 2018
  • "Our policy is the complete, verifiable, irreversible denuclearization [...] of the Korean Peninsula. That is a policy that is commonly held by everyone in the region as well. [...] The Chinese have that as a stated policy. Russia has it as a stated policy. So regionally, all of the countries in the neighboring area, as well as the international community, are well aligned on the policy. How we achieve the ultimate endpoint, the final fully – full denuclearization, the verification of that, and the irreversibility of it, clearly that’s going to take some time. So how we begin the talks is yet to be determined, but we clearly need a signal from North Korea that they understand these talks must lead to that conclusion. The pathway of how you get there, that is the nature of the negotiation. There’ll be some give and take to achieve those objectives. So that’s – that objective has never changed. [...] We have to have the shared view that that is the reason we’re talking, that’s the purpose of these talks, and it is through those talks that North Korea actually can chart the way for themselves of a more secure future, a more prosperous future for their people as well. So there are very positive outcomes to these talks for North Korea, as there will be positive outcomes for the security of the entire region. That is the nature of the negotiations." [SourceInterview With Elise Labott of CNN. January 5, 2018
  • "Well, I think it’s too early to tell. We need to wait and see what the outcome of their talks are. The President had a – President Trump had a good call with President Moon yesterday morning, which I participated in, and their intent is to talk about the Olympics – obviously, a very important upcoming event for South Korea – and the potential participation of North Korea in those Olympics. So our understanding is that’s the content of the meeting. So I think it’s a little early to draw any conclusions. [...] I know some are speculating that this may be their first effort to open a channel. But as you know, we’ve had channels open to North Korea for some time, and so they do know how to reach us when – if and when they’re ready to engage with us as well." [SourceInterview With Elise Labott of CNN. January 5, 2018
  • "I think that that risk has been there from the very beginning because of the regime we’re dealing with. And the lack of communication with the North Korean regime, the fact that Kim Jong-un has by and large isolated himself not just from the United States, he’s isolated himself from everyone. Which I think is why this upcoming first approach to South Korea, it could be meaningful, it could be important, it could be a meeting about the Olympics, and then nothing else happens." [Source] Interview with Matt Lee and Joshua Lederman of Associated Press. January 5, 2018
  • "The South Koreans indicated to us that they have no intention of engaging on anything further [with North Korea]  than that because the parties are not at the table to deal with those issues. So what – is this the beginning of something? I think it’s just – it’s premature to know. We’ll see. We’ll get a readout of that meeting and we’ll see is there – did the North Koreans come with more than just wanting to talk about the Olympics? We don’t know yet." [Source] Interview with Matt Lee and Joshua Lederman of Associated Press. January 5, 2018

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here.

South China Sea

 

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here.

Southeast Asia/ASEAN

  • "On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I wish people around the world good health, peace, and prosperity on the occasion of the Lunar New Year on February 16, 2018. Let us endeavor to continue to foster closer cooperation, promote greater understanding, and build a better world for each other and for our children. We hope that the Year of the Dog will bring even greater success and opportunity for all." [SourceCelebrating the Lunar New Year. February 14, 2018
  • "On behalf of the United States of America, I offer congratulations to President Htin Kyaw and the people of Myanmar on the occasion of Myanmar’s Independence Day on January 4, 2018. For decades, the United States has stood with the people of Myanmar in their pursuit of peace, freedom, and justice. We remain committed to helping advance Myanmar’s democratic transition, and continue to support the civilian government in efforts to end decades of conflict; strengthen respect for human rights, transparency, and rule of law; and foster inclusive economic development. At the same time, we urge authorities to take further steps to ensure everyone has full and equal access to the opportunities and the benefits of a democratic society. We wish all of Myanmar’s people peace, security, and prosperity in the coming year." [Source] Burmese (Myanmar) National Day. January 2, 2018

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here.

Summits - APEC, East Asia (EAS), & US-ASEAN

 

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here.

Trade & Investment

 

For a historical list of statements and policies in 2017, click here.

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Methodology: Policy materials and quotations from Secretary of State Rex Tillerson are limited to after January 11, 2017 when he underwent a confirmation hearing before the Senate. Should any quotations before the period be deemed relevant they will be indicated by an asterisk (*) after the date. In all cases, these additional quotations were made within the year prior to the start of the Trump Administration. Flag icons that indicate which countries members of the Trump administration have traveled to are provided by Freepik, accessed through www.flaticon.com.

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